[Read] ➲ The Broken Spears Author Miguel León-Portilla – 9tvuk.us

The Broken Spears Until , When This Book Was Published For The First Time, The Only Organized Testimony About The Conquest Was The Victorious Chronicle Of The Spaniards Themselves Miguel Le N Portilla Had The Incomparable Success Of Organizing Texts Translated From Nahuatl By Ngel Mar A Garibay Kintana To Give Us The The Aztec Account Of The Conquest Of Mexico Indigenous People Of Tenochtitl N, Tlatelolco, Texcoco, Chalco And Tlaxcala Were Formed About The Struggle Against The Conquerors And The Final Ruin Of The Aztec WorldAn Account Of The Omens That Announced The Disaster, A Description Of Cortes Progress, A Chronicle Of The Heroic Battle Of The Ancient Mexicans In Defense Of Their Culture And Of Their Own Lives, A Civilization That Was Lost Forever, A Great Epic Poem Of The Origins Of Mexican Nationality, The Aztec Account Of The Conquest Of Mexico Is Already A Classic Book And An Indispensable Reading Work

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Broken Spears book, this is one of the most wanted Miguel León-Portilla author readers around the world.

[Read] ➲ The Broken Spears  Author Miguel León-Portilla – 9tvuk.us
  • Paperback
  • 196 pages
  • The Broken Spears
  • Miguel León-Portilla
  • English
  • 16 January 2018
  • 0807055018

10 thoughts on “The Broken Spears

  1. says:

    No siempre hay una sola verdad frente a un hecho Visi n de los vencidos cr nicas ind genas es justamente el otro lado de la conquista, contado por los que vivieron, sufrieron y vieron su cultura perderse a causa de la conquista.Tuve que leerlo a las apuradas para realizar un trabajo sobre las cr nicas ind genas, y en verdad es muy completo Me ha dado mucha informaci n que no estaba al tanto, y lo agradezco.Siempre es bueno conocer los dos lados de una misma moneda.

  2. says:

    I had to read this for my intro class to Latin America from prehistory to 1800 I absolutely enjoyed reading it Getting a peak into what the Mexicas felt, saw, and experienced was priceless for understanding the Conquest of Mexico in full The language though melancholy was quite beautiful I highly recommend for all history fans.

  3. says:

    A History by the Defeated, for the DefeatedHistory has always been written by the winners and for the winners This has never been truer than the account of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire The history that has been taught in schools gives an account of a heroic battle between good and evil however the accounts in Miguel Leon Portilla s Broken Spears sheds new light on a subject that has been dulled by relentless repetition of a victor s history The importance of a collection of a A History by the Defeated, for the DefeatedHistory has always been written by the winners and for the winners This has never been truer than the account of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire The history that has been taught in schools gives an account of a heroic battle between good and evil however the accounts in Miguel Leon Portilla s Broken Spears sheds new light on a subject that has been dulled by relentless repetition of a victor s history The importance of a collection of accounts such as the one found in Broken Spears has untold value both in its factual documents shared by the native people who were witness to the events that occurred during the conquest, and also for its expressive value that many cultures throughout history and the present can perhaps, relate to The idea that the facts of the Spanish Conquest of the Aztecs are well known is an enduring illusion that needs to be reconciled with the accounts of the witnesses of these events What is imperative to understanding the importance of this collection of accounts is that for hundreds of years, the Aztec people and their descendents were completely denied a voice in the chronicling of their own history Broken Spears gives the voice that was found wanted, and re affirms the history of the Aztec Empire As callous as it sounds, especially after reading these accounts, I find that I have never really thought about the Aztec Empire I have been herded in by the history that I was spoon fed through early education I never realized what a significant event this was, both in the telling of my history as an American butimportantly for the people of the Aztec Empire I can honestly say that all of the information that I absorbed from reading these accounts was brand new for me I found the entire book fascinating, and think that it should be added to the required texts in the curriculum of schools It is like when the Great Oz is unveiled the reader is both shocked, and amazed by the events One specific passage in the book that really amazed me is as follows Thus encouraged, they grew so brave that the slaughter and havoc increased beyond imagining page 45 This passage is part of a detailing that illustrates the massacre at Cholula which was truly a massacre as the native people of Cholula were unarmed and had no warning of an impending attack Another important element of this history that is compelling for me is that the Spaniards were quick to align themselves with the Tlaxcaltecas which was always complete unknown to me Again, the history that is taught in school tells the story of how Cortes defeated the Aztecs with just his thin numbers of Soldiers, and to realize that he aligned himself with this large group of natives, who then pursued a personal vendetta against this virtually innocent neighboring tribe is shocking With all of this virtually new information on the Spanish Conquest of the Aztec Empire, there can still be only one way that chips fall in regards to the outcome Tenochtitlan falls The Aztec people were in no place to take up battle with the Spaniards and their new found allies Gunpowder, advanced technology, ideology and disease all played a key role in the fall of Tenochtitlan Firstly, gunpowder was completely unknown to the Aztec people When Motecuhzoma sent his messengers to greet Cortes they were nearly overcome with fear as was undoubtedly Cortes goal, when Cortes fired his cannon The messengers were bound with chains When this had been done, the great cannon was fired off The messengers lost their senses and fainted away page 26 This excerpt from Broken Spears does a fantastic job of showing the demeanor of Cortes straight from the first encounter with the Aztec Empire He takes this opportunity to show his power over them, and strike fear into their hearts Not only was gunpowder a form of advanced technology that the Spaniards had over the Aztec people, but the use of heavy metals in their armor, and their strategic advancements were also key to the defeat of Motecuhzoma and his people Cortes was a very smart logistician and strategist when dealing with the battle he waged against the Aztecs He showed great skill, which the Aztec people, although were also very competent when it came to battle, would be unable to overcome, or were to na ve to capitalize on when the time revealed itself Thirdly, ideologies played another key role in the fall of Tenochtitlan The Aztec people had very strict beliefs and therefore rules when it came to battle There were unprepared for the type of warfare that they would face with the Spaniards By the time The Night of Sorrows took place, the rule of the Motecuhzoma lacked all legitimacy, and the people basically were acting as a militia fighting for number one, and not an empire Lastly, and I think most importantly, was the spread of small pox virus throughout the country Whether or not the Aztec people would have raged terrible war against the Spaniards and drove them off, the damage was already done Germ warfare is deadly with a capital D and the Aztec people were uncorrupted by diseases that were found in Europe at this time This would prove to be their downfall The toll taken on the Aztecs was so tremendous that no matter when or who or how waged war against them, they were doomed The significance of Broken Spears is one of reinforcement of the legitimacy of a people In the world that we all live in today, people everywhere are fighting for recognition from their government specifically seen the Arab Spring of 2011 and 2012 A book like this one has the opportunity not only to radically change the way that indigenous people of the Aztec Empire are viewed and evaluated by the people of the World but also gives the descendents of this group of people a voice to be heard

  4. says:

    A must read for all those interested in a history not often written A history written by the nearly vanquished Before read this book, I did not understand why Mexico still has a significant number of citizens who still speak native languages as either their first or their only language They were nearly vanquished I knew that English language has survived the English royalty being defeated I was taught at university that English was the only language my professors knew to have kept thein lan A must read for all those interested in a history not often written A history written by the nearly vanquished Before read this book, I did not understand why Mexico still has a significant number of citizens who still speak native languages as either their first or their only language They were nearly vanquished I knew that English language has survived the English royalty being defeated I was taught at university that English was the only language my professors knew to have kept thein language and did not switch their language to that of the ruling class That was what my professors of English and rhetoric knew Know I know differently And I am glad to know how the Mexican natives have held on their languages

  5. says:

    This book provides a detailed account of the destruction of the Nahuatl culture as witnessed by a few of its survivors.Some questions I ve always had with regards to the meeting of these cultures what was going through the native s mind when they first saw these ships And how did they interpret their own downfall Our knowledge of the events that transpired in the colonization process is mainly from the Spaniards point of view Leaving an equally important narrative ignored and forgotten For This book provides a detailed account of the destruction of the Nahuatl culture as witnessed by a few of its survivors.Some questions I ve always had with regards to the meeting of these cultures what was going through the native s mind when they first saw these ships And how did they interpret their own downfall Our knowledge of the events that transpired in the colonization process is mainly from the Spaniards point of view Leaving an equally important narrative ignored and forgotten For instance we know that destructive technology and monotheistic religion gave the Spanish reasons to think the indians were savages and inferioir In stark contrast, the Aztecs humanized the gods stating in the nahuatl passages how greed consumed the barbarian s eyes at the sight of gold

  6. says:

    La llegada de los espa oles a Am rica contada desde el hombre ind gena, que tras luchar a muerte por su libertad, vio morir a su gente, vio contaminar sus r os con la sangre de los vencidos, vio el hambre y la desolaci n por todas partes Una versi n de la historia que impresiona al coraz n, porque uno no puede salir impert rrito de un relato que mueve los cimientos de lo que la iglesia, los pol ticos, la SEP nos han contado durante tantos a os de la conquista espa ola en M xico.

  7. says:

    Siempre me ha atra do la historia de los ind genas, sobre todo antes de la llegada de los espa oles este libro narra la ca da de uno de los pueblos m s fuertes de la Am rica precolombina y lo que llev a ello se comprende mucho mejor el c mo ocurri todo desde la visi n de los vencidos y no de los vencedores, hay una diferencia importante entre una versi n y la otra.

  8. says:

    Nechce sa mi ta o tom, ako niekto niekoho s ahuje z ko e, ani ak ide o domorod kmene.

  9. says:

    It s as refreshing as it was when it was first published many years ago Leon Portillo s constructed account of the vision of the vanquished has been somehow rejuvenated with new Nahua sources i.e Emiliano Zapata s statements , which confirm the continuity, and transformation, of this vision throughout time In recent years, academic studies have beeninclined to also address cultural adaptations which certainly allowed these voices to be reproduced and heard for many centuries af It s as refreshing as it was when it was first published many years ago Leon Portillo s constructed account of the vision of the vanquished has been somehow rejuvenated with new Nahua sources i.e Emiliano Zapata s statements , which confirm the continuity, and transformation, of this vision throughout time In recent years, academic studies have beeninclined to also address cultural adaptations which certainly allowed these voices to be reproduced and heard for many centuries after the Conquest Looking back, it is amazing how, despite the fact that these are voices of the defeated , they also permeated other voices and echoed for long enough to still be heard in the present Under this perspective, this book is not a story of the defeated but a story of survivors The Broken Spears have not vanished, are still there to be seen

  10. says:

    Having read many of the Spanish accounts of the Conquest of Mexico it was extremely interesting to see the same story from the other side Although this book lacks a strong narrative flow and overall context which would be critical for someone new to the subject area, if you are familiar with the Spanish version of events, then this is a must read that fills in a lot of gaps in the Spanish account which helps to humanize the Aztec Mexica and explain how cultural differences have lead to misinter Having read many of the Spanish accounts of the Conquest of Mexico it was extremely interesting to see the same story from the other side Although this book lacks a strong narrative flow and overall context which would be critical for someone new to the subject area, if you are familiar with the Spanish version of events, then this is a must read that fills in a lot of gaps in the Spanish account which helps to humanize the Aztec Mexica and explain how cultural differences have lead to misinterpretations on both sides It is a fairly quick read and well worth the time if you want to round out your knowledge of the events leading up to and following the fall of Tenochtitlan

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