[Ebook] ↠ Teaching to Transgress Author bell hooks – 9tvuk.us

Teaching to Transgress In Teaching To Transgress, Bell Hooks Writer, Teacher, And Insurgent Black Intellectual Writes About A New Kind Of Education, Educations As The Practice Of Freedom Teaching Students To Transgress Against Racial, Sexual, And Class Boundaries In Order To Achieve The Gift Of Freedom Is, For Hooks, The Teacher S Most Important GoalBell Hooks Speaks To The Heart Of Education Today How Can We Rethink Teaching Practices In The Age Of Multiculturalism What Do We Do About Teachers Who Do Not Want To Teach, And Students Who Do Not Want To Learn How Should We Deal With Racism And Sexism In The Classroom Full Of Passion And Politics, Teaching To Transgress Combines Practical Knowledge Of The Classroom With A Deeply Felt Connection To The World Of Emotions And Feelings This Is The Rare Book About Teachers And Students That Dares To Raise Critical Questions About Eros And Rage, Grief And Reconciliation, And The Future O Teaching Its Self To Educate As The Practice Of Freedom, Writes Bell Hooks, Is A Way Of Teaching That Any One Can Learn Teaching To Transgress Is The Record Of One Gifted Teacher S Struggle To Make Classrooms Work From The Back Of The Book

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Teaching to Transgress book, this is one of the most wanted bell hooks author readers around the world.

[Ebook] ↠ Teaching to Transgress  Author bell hooks – 9tvuk.us
  • Paperback
  • 216 pages
  • Teaching to Transgress
  • bell hooks
  • English
  • 24 October 2018
  • 0415908086

10 thoughts on “Teaching to Transgress

  1. says:

    Teaching to Transgress is probably a book every person in a putative position of authority should read not just teachers, but parents, coaches, community leaders etc It s accessible, passionate, quick to read, and offers a refreshing conception of education as something that s not politically neutral and shouldn t be about just gaining marketable skills to get a job I loved hooks distinction between the feminist classroom and the Women s Studies classroom, her approach that calls for equali Teaching to Transgress is probably a book every person in a putative position of authority should read not just teachers, but parents, coaches, community leaders etc It s accessible, passionate, quick to read, and offers a refreshing conception of education as something that s not politically neutral and shouldn t be about just gaining marketable skills to get a job I loved hooks distinction between the feminist classroom and the Women s Studies classroom, her approach that calls for equalizing neutralizing power relations between student and teacher, and her rejection of the banking approach to learning These ideas weren t new to me, but I appreciate how straightforwardly they were presented, and I m glad I ve read it.Where hooks somewhat lost me was in some of her expectations and methods, particularly around her desire to erase the separation between public and private and to always bring the body into the classroom There s surely some very legitimate criticism about people who claim to hold certain political positions but don t actually put them into practice on a daily basis, which is something I and everyone I know struggle with But hooks isn t only writing about being politically consistent she s calling for the annihilation of personal boundaries in order to attain some kind of self actualization and heal what she perceives to be the mind body spirit split of the wounded educator Early in the book she states that she expects her students to take the risk of confessing personal narratives to their classmates in order to stay registered in her courses, but doesn t acknowledge the danger of recounting sensitive, potentially traumatic details when there s no guarantee that they ll be received well or even stay within the walls of the classroom This anxiety and pain is necessary, according to hooks, in order to heal and to learn Perhaps I m too jaded and suspicious of the purity of others intentions but I d never willingly put myself in a situation that could have direct and long lasting negative effects on my psychological or even physical wellbeing, yet hooks doesn t allow for principled opposition to that kind of mandatory disclosure I d be a resisting student to her My other major cause for pause is with how hooks suggests teachers execute this approach to teaching, insofar as she assumes visibility is something that s always desirable I can see how this could be true in many, perhaps even most cases, and it s something I try to keep an eye on in my own teaching, but I m unconvinced that it s a uniformly good thing I mean this with respect to power dynamics, but alsoplainly To take an example from my own education, the best experience of my entire undergraduate degree was a course on the philosophy of science taught by a man who was obsessed with Plato s cave allegory and Eric Voegelin, and as disdainful of absolutist empiricism as he was of postmodern relativism Twice a week, first thing in the morning, he lectured for the full 75 minutes and never deliberately encouraged student participation hooks would, I suspect, consider this a travesty and yet I learnedabout myself sitting there and listening to someone who I m sure would be horrified by my politics but who made epistemology and ontology utterly fascinating Because I know he wouldn t call on me, because I knew he didn t even know my name until the end of the first term, I was able to sit there and absorb, reflect on, assess and critique everything he said on my own terms and without feeling visible Now, I m perfectly willing to admit that a lot of these criticisms are about individual learning preferences and my own solitary nature, and maybe my issues are ultimatelyabout personal style than political positions Still, I don t think visibility is an unmitigated good, nor can I imagine a situation where it would be appropriate for a student to start to dance with me to apologize for coming in late I remember the day he came to class late and came right up to the front, picked me up and whirled me around The class laughed I called him fool and laughed It was by way of apologizing for being late, for missing any moment of classroom passion And so he brought his own moment I, too, love to dance And so we danced our way into the future as comrades and friends bound by all we had learned I ll heed hooks own advice to take the good and leave it at that

  2. says:

    This book renewed my passion for teaching, especially in light of the constant rhetoric of adult education existing to create an efficient economic pipeline It reminded me at a critical time that I am not the only one who believes education of marginalized people can and should be somethingI found that hooks had articulated many things I felt experienced but could not name, which proves her point about the power of theory Chapter 3 in particular is critical reading for anyone te This book renewed my passion for teaching, especially in light of the constant rhetoric of adult education existing to create an efficient economic pipeline It reminded me at a critical time that I am not the only one who believes education of marginalized people can and should be somethingI found that hooks had articulated many things I felt experienced but could not name, which proves her point about the power of theory Chapter 3 in particular is critical reading for anyone teaching in a multicultural setting Through stories and dialogue, hooks explores how the intersection of theory, identity, teaching, and injustice is experienced in postsecondary classrooms She offers a theoretical framework practical skills that she has successfully used to create an engaging, inclusive classroom My one warning is that as a pioneer in stepping out from behind the podium, hooks approach feels incomplete I think teachers can dobeyond just transforming content or teaching methods by designing learning that helps students focus apply their reflections skills to their own context, which hooks confesses having struggled with However, this does not diminish the fact that hooks offers an important critical historic perspective in an extremely easy to read format

  3. says:

    The academy is not paradise But learning is a place where paradise can be created The classroom, with all its limitations, remains a location of possibility In that field of possibility we have the opportunity to labor for freedom, to demand of ourselves and our comrades, an openness of mind and heart that allows us to face reality even as we collectively imagine ways to move beyond boundaries, to transgress This is education as the practice of freedom.

  4. says:

    This is the first book of hooks that I ve read a collection of stand alone essays in which she reflects on the concept of pedagogy as liberation Essay collections are almost always a mixed bag and there are some in here that didn t work for me the one that s structured as a dialogue between her and her writing pseudonym, or the rather uncomfortable one on eros in the classroom that one needed a lot of teasing out and consideration of agape, philia, storge, and a hell of a lotnuance and This is the first book of hooks that I ve read a collection of stand alone essays in which she reflects on the concept of pedagogy as liberation Essay collections are almost always a mixed bag and there are some in here that didn t work for me the one that s structured as a dialogue between her and her writing pseudonym, or the rather uncomfortable one on eros in the classroom that one needed a lot of teasing out and consideration of agape, philia, storge, and a hell of a lotnuance and acknowledgement of the power differentials and potentials for abuse within what she s advocating Yet there are other essays here which are powerful and sadly still relevantthan twenty years after the collection was first published Definitely recommended for those doing work in the college classroom

  5. says:

    Though this is an important book for teachers to consider, I found myself somewhat disappointed hooks definition of transgressive teaching, and critical pedagogy for that matter, are just too different from mine Her critical work seemswhat Alastair Pennycook calls emancipatory modernism, which comes dangerously close to the missionary mindset so often criticized by critical pedagogues I have nothing against hooks pedagogy, but my goal as a critical scholar is to question the systems o Though this is an important book for teachers to consider, I found myself somewhat disappointed hooks definition of transgressive teaching, and critical pedagogy for that matter, are just too different from mine Her critical work seemswhat Alastair Pennycook calls emancipatory modernism, which comes dangerously close to the missionary mindset so often criticized by critical pedagogues I have nothing against hooks pedagogy, but my goal as a critical scholar is to question the systems of thought that produce differencesand preferably find new ways of thinking There must always be an element of renewal and generation within transgressive approaches to theory and pedagogy.That being said, the last few chapters are useful to get teacher s thinking about how to transgress the assumptions behind the universal, liberal subject which is bodiless, classless, and speaks a perfect English hooks deliberately transgress these assumptions by bringing the body, class, and diverse languages back into the classroom

  6. says:

    Sometimes you read a book that manages somehow to articulate intuitions you ve always had And sometimes that book goes a step further, and challenges your view of the world or your understanding of your place in it Three things in particular I will take from this book 1 education as the practice of freedom is actually education as a process of self actualization, 2 coming to critical awareness can be a painful process there is always conflict in spaces of unlearning, and 3 with critical Sometimes you read a book that manages somehow to articulate intuitions you ve always had And sometimes that book goes a step further, and challenges your view of the world or your understanding of your place in it Three things in particular I will take from this book 1 education as the practice of freedom is actually education as a process of self actualization, 2 coming to critical awareness can be a painful process there is always conflict in spaces of unlearning, and 3 with critical awareness, must come praxis, that is, action and reflection what good is critical awareness if we do not immediately put that awareness to work in the world This is a powerful book Definitely re readable

  7. says:

    A great book that really makes you think about your role as a student or a teacher in the classroom There were times that Ms hooks words made me uncomfortable because of the truth they carried At times I do feel that theI know and learn about feminism, the less I can enjoy certain things It s not because I don t consider myself a feminist but because so many people engage in offensive, degrading behavior and expect to be rewarded for it Unlearning sexism and racism can result in a A great book that really makes you think about your role as a student or a teacher in the classroom There were times that Ms hooks words made me uncomfortable because of the truth they carried At times I do feel that theI know and learn about feminism, the less I can enjoy certain things It s not because I don t consider myself a feminist but because so many people engage in offensive, degrading behavior and expect to be rewarded for it Unlearning sexism and racism can result in a painful process, but the rewards are plentiful

  8. says:

    An important book for teachers concerned about the impact anti oppression or the opposite of our teaching Very dense so I will just share one idea that I take away I ve tended to think about anti oppression education in terms of the content that the teacher presents and that the class learns hooks argues that how you teach and the dynamics of the educational space you help create are just as important as content in creating a classroom where education can bewell, freedom.

  9. says:

    I think this is my favourite hooks book so far

  10. says:

    When I was in grad school I was always acutely aware of the ways that set me apart Many people from marginalized communities have written extensively about similar experiences these programs are not made for usTeaching to Transgressalong withPedagogy of the Oppressedoffers a view and a guide to making higher educationaccessible The term engaged pedagogy suggests a model opposite of the banking teaching method where teacher and student learn together from each other.Visiting t When I was in grad school I was always acutely aware of the ways that set me apart Many people from marginalized communities have written extensively about similar experiences these programs are not made for usTeaching to Transgressalong withPedagogy of the Oppressedoffers a view and a guide to making higher educationaccessible The term engaged pedagogy suggests a model opposite of the banking teaching method where teacher and student learn together from each other.Visiting these formative texts in my thinking and development this year have been necessary tools for me in the conversations that arise during our current political climate I find the notions and ideas that hooks, Freire, etc develop help me express the frustrations and anger from marginalized people I find them, over,useful when talking toliberal leaning people, who have good intentions but certain blindspots As with the engaged pedagogy model, I find these conversations are mutually beneficial and the collaboration to learn and discuss leads to better understanding in general But like the engaged pedagogy model there is a high level of frustration when attempting to break through people s unknown prejudices Presenting challenging ideas can be, well, challenging but books likeTeaching to Transgresshelps in the process of not just providing a method but also provides encouragement.While I definitely recommend this book to educators, it s a useful tool for anyone wanting to engage thoughtfully with people of different marginalized communities We re all in this together, we might as well learn how to communicate with and learn from one another

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